Do I Have the Right to an Attorney?

The words we all hear on television and the movies tell us it is so. Often referred to as the reading of the rights, the Miranda warnings require the police to tell someone being questioned that:
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to speak to an attorney, and to have an attorney present during any questioning. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided for you at public expense.
Maybe.
If …

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What to Do when the Government’s case rests primarily if not exclusively on the testimony of snitches
Almost every federal drug prosecution utilizes the “word” of informants or cooperating co-defendants at some level, whether in obtaining a wiretap order, a search warrant, an indictment or in the presentation of witnesses in the government’s case in chief at trial. The exchange of something, be it money, immunity, or a reduction of sentence, for the word of such individuals almost always underlies the use of what a snitch says.
One of the first things I …

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Do I Have the Right to an Attorney?

The words we all hear on television and the movies tell us it is so. Often referred to as the reading of the rights, the Miranda warnings require the police to tell someone being questioned that:
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to speak to an attorney, and to have an attorney present during any questioning. If you cannot afford an attorney, one will be provided for you at public expense.
Maybe.
If …

Articles, Featured »

The Truth Shall (Not) Set You Free

I recently read a letter written by an inmate who wrote that he knew that the truth shall set you free. He then went on to say that well, I told the truth and I’m still not free.
The United States and the Mississippi Constitutions give us the right to remain silent or, put another way, not to incriminate ourselves. The words we all hear on television and in the movies grew out of this right. The famous Miranda warnings tell someone being questioned by the police that: You have the …